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Transient Ischemic Attack

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a mini stroke that happens quickly. TIA occurs when there is a temporary stop in the blood flow to a particular part in the brain. It mimics stroke symptoms, albeit, they do not last for a long period of time. A TIA is said to often be warning sign for future strokes if nothing is done to prevent it. The primary difference between a TIA and a stroke is that after a TIA happens, the blockage is only temporary (transient). The blockage will eventually break and dissipate, therefore, there is no cell death among the brain tissue. Causes of Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) The main risk factor for a transient ischemic attack, not to mention stroke, is high blood pressure. Other major risk factors may include heart disease, high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, and a family history of stroke. All these may increase a person’s likelihood of suffering a TIA. Loss of blood flow to areas in the brain can be due to: A blood clot in one or more arteries of the brain or a blood clot that may transit to the brain from another body part (e.g. heart, legs, etc.) Blood vessel injury Blood vessel narrowing in the brain or going to the brain Symptoms of Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) As previously mentioned, a transient ischemic attack has stroke-like symptoms but the difference lies in the duration. In most cases, most TIA symptoms disappear within an hour of the first symptom, however, symptoms may also last for as long as 24 hours in some cases. The easiest way to remember the sudden...
Managing Obesity Through Lethbridge First Aid Classes

Managing Obesity Through Lethbridge First Aid Classes

Even though it is more advisable to focus on the prevention of obesity instead of its management, taking Lethbridge first aid classes in order to manage obesity should still be a must for residents. This is because recent data shows that obesity is already a common problem among residents which means that there are a lot of people who are prone to certain medical emergencies that can be directly caused by this disease such as difficulty of breathing. Here are some of the data which illustrates the important of taking Lethbridge first aid classes for obesity. Obesity among Residents According to the data that was releases through the Alberta Primary Health Care Community Profile that was released in 2013 by the government of Alberta, the percentage of people who suffer from obesity in Lethbridge is higher than the provincial percentage for 2011. The obesity percentage of Lethbridge is 26.7 while the provincial percentage for Alberta is only 19.6. This shows a disparity of more than 7% which is equivalent to thousands of residents. The number of people who suffer from obesity is also increasing every year. According to the same study, 22.2% of Lethbridge’s population is diagnosed with obesity in 2010. In 2011, this number rose to 26.7%. Obesity in the Future Aside from the number of people who are already suffering from obesity, the number of people who are likely to suffer from the condition is rising as well. In 2010, it has been determined that 33.4% of the population is suffering from being overweight. In 2011, it was revealed that 34.5% of the population is suffering being...
First Aid Management: Depression

First Aid Management: Depression

Depression is a serious medical disorder involving the brain. It is commonly characterized by constant sadness, loss of interest in activities, energy loss, and suicidal thoughts, among others. Depression is more than feeling “blue” or the sadness over everyday matters. Depression symptoms do not disappear easily. There are intense feelings of sadness and worthlessness that interfere with daily life. Genetic,environmental, psychological and biochemical factors are attributed to the variety of causes. Eight percent of Canadians will experience a major depression in their lifetime (Canadian Mental Health Association (ND). This does not count the people who will experience bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders and other mental disorders that may lead to depression.It is more common in women and typically begins sometime between ages 15 and 30. Forms of Depression There are several different forms of depressive disorders than an individual can suffer: Major Depression or Major Depressive Disorder Affects everyday functions that may disable a person May be experienced once only but often occurs multiple times Dysthymic Disorder or Dysthymia Chronic symptoms (lasting for more than two years) Not disabling a person but may prevent normal functioning May experience one or more episodes of major depression during their lifetime Minor Depression Symptoms may last for two weeks or more but not severe enough to meet full criteria for major depression Forms of Minor Depression: Psychotic depression: severe depression accompanied by a form of psychosis (e.g. having delusions or hallucinations) Postpartum depression: occurs in mothers who have recently given birth due to hormonal and physical changes in the body Seasonal affective disorder (SAD): onset of depression occurs during the winter months,...