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Transient Ischemic Attack

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a mini stroke that happens quickly. TIA occurs when there is a temporary stop in the blood flow to a particular part in the brain. It mimics stroke symptoms, albeit, they do not last for a long period of time. A TIA is said to often be warning sign for future strokes if nothing is done to prevent it. The primary difference between a TIA and a stroke is that after a TIA happens, the blockage is only temporary (transient). The blockage will eventually break and dissipate, therefore, there is no cell death among the brain tissue. Causes of Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) The main risk factor for a transient ischemic attack, not to mention stroke, is high blood pressure. Other major risk factors may include heart disease, high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, and a family history of stroke. All these may increase a person’s likelihood of suffering a TIA. Loss of blood flow to areas in the brain can be due to: A blood clot in one or more arteries of the brain or a blood clot that may transit to the brain from another body part (e.g. heart, legs, etc.) Blood vessel injury Blood vessel narrowing in the brain or going to the brain Symptoms of Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) As previously mentioned, a transient ischemic attack has stroke-like symptoms but the difference lies in the duration. In most cases, most TIA symptoms disappear within an hour of the first symptom, however, symptoms may also last for as long as 24 hours in some cases. The easiest way to remember the sudden...

Importance of Lethbridge First Aid: Heat-related Medical Problems

Even though Canada is well-known for having a generally cold climate, this does not make the entire country immune to high temperatures. On July 2014, several news outlets, including Global News Canada, reported that Lethbridge residents are experiencing temperatures that go as high as 30 degrees. For residents who live in countries where temperatures can go up to 43 degrees or even higher such as Australia, 30 degrees might seem nothing. However, for Lethbridge residents who are more accustomed to cold temperatures, this temperature can cause several health conditions which can become fatal if not treated immediately with first aid. This is why residents should learn about the importance of taking Lethbridge first aid for heat-related medical problems. Here are some of the reasons why they should take first aid classes. Residents are unprepared Because of the fact that Lethbridge residents do not experience hot weather conditions on a regular basis, most of them are caught off guard during those days when the temperature is higher than normal. Hence, when these temperatures strike, they do not know how to react. They do not know how to protect themselves from the scorching heat of the sun or how to manage and avoid the health complications that can be caused by this type of weather. Some residents are even unaware that these temperatures can cause a health complications which can directly lead to death. Hot weather can cause numerous health problems Aside from dehydration and skin problems, extreme heat can cause several health complications which can be very fatal if left untreated. Some of these complications include  heat exhaustion, heat edema...

Lethbridge First Aid: What is Heat Exhaustion?

When it comes to the complications of a hot summer weather, the first thing that usually comes into mind for residents who do not experience this type of climate on a regular basis is sunburn. This is why other medical conditions that are more life-threatening such as heat exhaustion and dehydration are often pushed to the side. On July 2014, Global News Canada interviewed Lethbridge residents who are enjoying the summer heat regarding the steps that they are taking to avoid the medical complications of the hot weather in which most of the respondents reported that their focus is sun-damage prevention. This is why learning more about heat exhaustion and how it can be managed by taking Lethbridge first aid classes is a must for residents. What is heat exhaustion? Heat exhaustion is defined as a type of fatigue that is caused by the insufficient supply of fluids and electrolytes in the body. This insufficiency happens when there is a decrease in the blood flow which caused the blood volume level to go down. Considering that fluid and electrolyte exchange happens in the bloodstream, a decrease in blood flow leads to insufficient fluids and electrolytes in the body. During the hot summer weather, the arteries and veins dilate which causes the blood flow inside the body to dramatically decrease. As a result, the body suffers from fatigue known as heat exhaustion. What are the symptoms of heat exhaustion? Some of the most common symptoms of heat exhaustion include profuse sweating, pale or flushed skin and lethargy. Recognizing these symptoms allow rescuers to immediately administer the right first aid techniques...

First Aid Basics: Difference of Heat Stroke and Heat Exhaustion

Even though heat exhaustion and heat stroke are one of the most well-known complications of enduring a hot weather, not a lot of people are aware that these two problems are actually different from each other. Oftentimes, they are used interchangeably which is why there are a lot of people who apply inappropriate and ineffective medical interventions on patients who are suffering from either of these two conditions. Considering that Lethbridge experiences bouts of hot weather which can cause these conditions, residents should learn about the differences between these two problems. They should also take Lethbridge first aid classes in order to learn how to handle these two types of medical problems appropriately. What is the difference between heat stroke and exhaustion? Even though both conditions are caused by the same precursor which is being exposed to hot weather conditions, their physiology or the way that they affect the body is very different. Heat exhaustion is mainly caused by the decrease in the blood flow within the veins and arteries which in turn causes fluid and electrolyte deficit. On the other hand, heat stroke causes all of the systems in the body to overheat which makes it impossible for the body to cool down. This is why heat stroke is regarded as a medical condition that is far more severe than heat exhaustion. What is the danger of interchanging these two terms? Considering that heat stroke is more severe than heat exhaustion, applying the medical interventions that can only manage heat exhaustion to patients who are actually suffering from heat stroke is very lethal and can cause death within...

First Aid Tips for Dehydration

One of the deadliest medical problems that can affect people who are exposed to a hot weather condition is dehydration. This is because when left untreated, dehydration can lead to severe complications or even death especially if the patient or the affected individual is a minor. Considering that Lethbridge residents are bound to experience hot weather conditions every now and then, learning about dehydration and taking Lethbridge first aid classes for its complications is highly advised. Here are some of the first aid tips for patients who are suffering from dehydration. For minors, calling the doctor or paramedics is the first step When it comes to dealing younger patients or children who are suffering from dehydration, first aid rescuers are advised to call the doctor immediately. This is because the underdeveloped bodies of children cannot cope with the effects of dehydration as easily and quickly as adults. This means that mild dehydration can rapidly escalate to moderate and severe dehydration especially if the child is suffering from other medical problems or are taking medications which can decrease fluid absorption in the body. For adults, call the doctor if the dehydration is caused by heat stroke While waiting for paramedics or doctors to arrive, rescuers are advised to rehydrate the afflicted adult patient by giving 2 quarts of any type of fluid every two hours. However, water is highly preferred since it can regulate body temperature more efficiently than other types of fluids. When giving liquids to senior citizens, rescuers should slowly introduce them in order to minimize the chances of choking or drowning. Watch out for falls and slips...